Agenda and minutes

Full Council - Tuesday, 15th March, 2022 2.00 pm

Venue: Council Chamber - The Guildhall, Portsmouth. View directions

Contact: Stewart Agland  Email: stewart.agland@portsmouthcc.gov.uk

Webcast: View the webcast

Items
No. Item

17.

Declaration of Members' Interests

Minutes:

Councillor Jeanette Smith declared a personal and prejudicial interest in minute 35 as a paid official of Unison.

 

Councillor Cal Corkery declared a personal, non-prejudicial interest in minute 35 as he was a member and paid official of a union.

 

In his capacity as the Council's nominated representative of the Hampshire Fire & Rescue Authority, Councillor Jason Fazackarley declared a personal, non-prejudicial interest in minute 39.

 

Councillor Claire Udy declared a personal, non-prejudicial interest in minute 34 as she was undergoing a diagnostic process under the Surrey & Borders Partnership.

18.

To approve as correct records the Minutes of the Ordinary and Extraordinary Council meetings held on 15 February 2022 pdf icon PDF 50 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

It was

 

Proposed by Councillor Gerald Vernon-Jackson

Seconded by Councillor Simon Bosher

 

That the minutes of the Ordinary and Extraordinary Council meetings held on 15 February 2022 be confirmed as correct records.

 

These were agreed by assent.

19.

To receive such communications as the Lord Mayor may desire to lay before the Council, including apologies for absence.

Minutes:

Apologies for absence had been received on behalf of Councillors Chris Attwell, Stuart Brown, Jo Hooper, Darren Sanders and Daniel Wemyss.

 

Apologies for lateness were received from Councillors Ian Holder, Terry Norton, and Claire Udy.

 

The Lord Mayor took the opportunity to remind Council that he and the Lady Mayoress would be supporting St Mary's Church, Fratton, annual project and encouraged members to donate Easter Eggs to this worthy cause.

 

At the invitation of the Lord Mayor the Leader of the Council updated Council on the latest Covid-19 statistics for the city which had realised a 74% increase in the infection rate and a 50% increase in hospitalisations during the preceding week.

 

The Lord Mayor went on record to affirm the Council's support for the Ukrainian people following the invasion of the Ukraine by the Russian Federation.

 

At the invitation of the Lord Mayor each group leader spoke to confirm their group's solidarity with the Ukrainian people.

20.

Deputations from the Public under Standing Order No 24

Deputations by members of the public may be made on any item where a decision is going to be taken.  The request should be made in writing to the contact officer (stewart.agland@portsmouthcc.gov.uk) by 12 noon of the working day before the meeting (so Monday 14 March for this meeting), and must include the purpose of the deputation (for example, for or against the recommendations). Email requests are accepted 

Minutes:

The City Solicitor advised that no deputation requests had been made under the provisions of Standing Order No 24.

21.

Questions from the Public under Standing Order 25 pdf icon PDF 77 KB

Minutes:

The City Solicitor advised that one public question had been received from Mr John Thurston.

 

Mr Thurston asked his question, as below:

 

"Could the Cabinet Member for Health, Wellbeing and Social Care tell us what action the Council is taking to bring our GP services back to Portsea?"

 

Councillor Jason Fazackarley, Cabinet Member for Health, Wellbeing and Social Care, provided his verbal response to this question and the supplementary question that followed.

22.

Appointments

Minutes:

The Lord Mayor advised that there were no appointments to be made at this meeting.

23.

Urgent Business - To receive and consider any urgent and important business from Members of the Cabinet in accordance with Standing Order No 26.

Minutes:

The Lord Mayor advised that was no urgent business to transact at this meeting.

24.

Update on Planning Development Management and increase in capacity pdf icon PDF 158 KB

To receive and consider the attached report from Cabinet held on 8 February (recommendation also attached).

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Council Agenda Item 8 (Cabinet minute 10)

 

Update on Planning Development Management and increase in capacity

 

Cllr Ryan Brent objected to Cabinet minute 10 to allow for debate.

 

It was therefore proposed by Councillor Gerald Vernon-Jackson

Seconded by Councillor Hugh Mason

 

That the recommendation in Cabinet minute 10 be approved.

 

Council debated the matter.

 

Following the debate it was RESOLVED that Council NOTED the update report.

25.

Capital Strategy 2022/23 - 2031/32 pdf icon PDF 233 KB

To receive and consider the attached report from Cabinet held on 8 March (recommendation to follow)

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Council Agenda Item 9 (Cabinet minute 32)

 

Capital Strategy 2022/23-2031/32

 

The recommendations within this report were approved unopposed.

 

It was therefore RESOLVED

 

1.             That Part I of the Capital Strategy (Capital Expenditure and Aspirations) be approved including:

 

i.               The Short / Medium / Long-term Aspirations set out in Appendix 1.

 

2.             That Part II of the Capital Strategy (Borrowing and Investing) be approved including:

 

i.               The Minimum Revenue Provision (MRP) for Debt Repayment Policy (Part II, (paragraph 2.5)

ii.             The investment indicators in Part II - Appendix 2 (Part II, paragraph 3.5)

iii.            That the Director of Finance and Resources (Section 151 Officer) will bring a report to the next Cabinet and City Council if (Part II, paragraph 3.5):

 

 A). The Council's gross General Fund (GF) debt exceeds 500% of GF net service expenditure or;

 

 B) Overall investment income from investment properties and long term treasury management investments exceeds 7.5% of GF net service expenditure.

26.

Treasury Management Policy 2022/23 pdf icon PDF 150 KB

To receive and consider the attached report from Cabinet held on 8 March (recommendation to follow)

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Council Agenda Item 10 (Cabinet minute 33)

 

Treasury Management Policy 2022/23

 

Cllr Scott Payter-Harris objected to Cabinet minute 33 to allow for debate.

 

It was therefore proposed by Councillor Gerald Vernon-Jackson

Seconded by Councillor Hugh Mason

 

That the recommendation in Cabinet minute 33 be approved.

 

Council debated the matter.

 

Following a vote it was RESOLVED

 

1.             That the upper limit for principal sums invested for longer than 365 days contained in paragraph 4.7 of the attached Treasury Management Policy Statement be approved;

 

2.             That the upper and lower limits on the maturity structure of borrowing contained in appendix 5.1 of the attached Treasury Management Policy Statement be approved;

 

3.             That the attached Treasury Management Policy Statement including the Treasury Management Strategy and Annual Investment Strategy for 2022/23 be approved;

 

4.             That the following change compared to the previous Annual Investment Strategy be noted:

 

i.               that the UK Infrastructure Bank be added to the approved sources of borrowing as set out in paragraph 3.9 of the Treasury Management Policy Statement;

 

5.             As set out in paragraph 1.4 of the Treasury Management Policy Statement, the Director of Finance and Resources (Section 151 Officer) and officers nominated by him have delegated authority to:

 

i.               invest surplus funds in accordance with the approved Annual Investment Strategy;

ii.             borrow to finance short term cash deficits and capital payments from any reputable source within the authorised limit for external debt of £963m approved by the City Council on 9 February 2021;

iii.            reschedule debt to even the maturity profile or to achieve revenue savings;

iv.            to buy and sell foreign currency, and to purchase hedging instruments including forward purchases, forward options, and foreign exchange rate swaps to mitigate the foreign exchange risks associated with some contracts that are either priced in foreign currencies or where the price is indexed against foreign currency exchange rates;

 

6.             That the Director of Finance and Resources (Section 151 Officer) has the power to delegate treasury management operations to relevant staff;

 

7.             That the Chief Executive, the Leader of the City Council and the Chair of the Governance and Audit and Standards Committee be informed of any variances from the Treasury Management Policy when they become apparent, and that the Leader of the City Council be consulted on remedial action (paragraph 1.2.2 of Treasury Management Policy Statement).

27.

Health & Wellbeing Strategy 2022-2030 pdf icon PDF 301 KB

To receive and consider the attached report from Cabinet held on 8 March (recommendation to follow)

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Council Agenda Item 11 (Cabinet minute 35)

 

Health and Wellbeing Strategy 2022-2030

 

Cllr George Fielding objected to Cabinet minute 35 to allow for debate.

 

It was therefore proposed by Councillor Jason Fazackarley

Seconded by Councillor Suzy Horton

 

That the recommendation in Cabinet minute 35 be approved.

 

Council debated the matter.

 

Following a vote it was RESOLVED that the Health and Wellbeing Strategy (HWS) for 2022-2030 attached at Appendix 1 of the report be APPROVED.

28.

Solent Freeport Full Business Case pdf icon PDF 362 KB

To receive and consider the attached report from Cabinet held on 8 March (recommendation to follow)

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Council Agenda Item 12 (Cabinet minute 38)

 

Solent Freeport Full Business Case

 

Cllr Simon Bosher objected to Cabinet minute 38 to allow for debate.

 

It was therefore proposed by Councillor Gerald Vernon-Jackson

Seconded by Councillor Hugh Mason

 

That the recommendation in Cabinet minute 38 be approved.

 

Council debated the matter.

 

Following a vote it was RESOLVED that Full Council:

 

(i)             APPROVED the report; and

 

(ii)           Delegated to the Chief Executive and the S.151 Officer in consultation with the Deputy Leader of the City Council to approve the Solent Freeport Full Business Case (FBC) on behalf of Portsmouth City Council, and to see it submitted to Central Government following consultation with the S.151 and Monitoring Officers of each of the tax sites.

29.

Carbon Budget Methodology pdf icon PDF 149 KB

To receive and consider the attached report from Cabinet held on 8 March (recommendation to follow)

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Council Agenda Item 13 (Cabinet minute 34)

 

Carbon Budget Methodology

 

Cllr Jeanette Smith objected to Cabinet minute 34 to allow for debate.

 

It was therefore proposed by Councillor Kimberly Barrett

Seconded by Councillor Gerald Vernon-Jackson

 

That the recommendation in Cabinet minute 34 be approved

 

Council debated the matter.

 

Following the debate, it was RESOLVED that Full Council NOTED the report.

30.

Pay Policy Statement pdf icon PDF 149 KB

To receive and consider the attached report from Employment Committee held on 9 March (recommendation to follow)

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Council Agenda Item 14 (Employment Committee Minute 8)

 

Pay Policy Statement

 

The recommendation within this report was approved unopposed

It was therefore RESOLVED that Full Council APPROVED the Pay Policy Statement attached as Appendix 1 to the report.

31.

Notices of Motion

32.

Defibrillators in Portsmouth pdf icon PDF 330 KB

Proposed by Councillor Kimberly Barrett

Seconded by Councillor Ian Holder

 

Ever since the harrowing scenes of Danish footballer Christian Eriksen receiving cardiac treatment were broadcast onto the screens of millions of people during a game at Euro 2020, the recognition of the need of public defibrillators has become more apparent.

 

On average, 30,000 people each year suffer a sudden cardiac arrest outside of hospital, and 20% of these incidents occur in public spaces. Only 10% of victims of cardiac arrests survive when the incident occurs outside hospital.

 

Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) can play a significant role in saving the lives of people who suffer heart attacks in public. It is estimated that a shock from an AED, alongside CPR treatment, increases survival rates to 75-80%.

 

This Council commends the many organisations, schools and communities who have already installed community defibrillators that are accessible not just to the organisations themselves, but, that are also accessible to members of the public. It acknowledges that places like Fratton Community Centre are raising funds to make sure that the centre will have access to this life saving equipment.

 

The council also congratulates the pupils, their parents and the teachers of Meon Infant School, Meon Junior School and Moorings Way School as well as the Thinking Schools Academy Trust who recently raised a significant amount of money to buy and install 2 new defibrillators alongside CIL contributions from Milton councillors for use by the schools and for public use as well.

 

This Council also commends the outstanding work and care that the South Central Ambulance Service, Queen Alexandra Hospital and staff across all areas of the NHS provide Portsmouth residents 24/7, 365 days a year. The Council would also like to thank the work that the British Heart Foundation are doing to continue to research into cardiac arrests but also, the campaigning that they have done alongside other organisations to get CPR onto the curriculum at English secondary schools by the end of this school year. This is alongside the work that they are doing regarding 'The Circuit' to create a national network of defibrillators which will link to every ambulance service in the country and in the public domain to help save more lives from 'Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrests' (OHCA).

 

Although there are a number of public defibrillators on council premises and assets and further more on non-council owned land and buildings, there may be gaps in the provision of publicly accessible AEDs across the city.

 

Council resolves to ask Cabinet:

 

      To add as many existing defibrillator locations to the list hosted on the council's website, and to also add those not already on the South Central Ambulance Service's 'Save a life' App, to make sure that there is a log of as many locations as possible of public defibrillators in Portsmouth including those in non-council premises.

 

      Review and, where appropriate, seek to increase the provision of defibrillators across council-owned spaces including public parks, community centres, leisure facilities, and areas of high public footfall and to continue to support businesses, community associations and schools who may wish to install their own and bring an update report to Cabinet to demonstrate progress.

Minutes:

It was

 

Proposed by Councillor Kimberly Barrett

Seconded by Councillor Ian Holder

 

That notice of motion (a) as set out on the agenda be adopted.

 

As an amendment it was

 

Proposed by Councillor Simon Bosher

Seconded by Councillor Lewis Gosling

 

To delete paragraph five and replace with: 

 

"This Council congratulates the work of all those schools and community groups who have raised money to buy and install defibrillators and acknowledges the support of Ward Councillors from all political parties who have supported the fund raising efforts with CIL contributions."

 

Add a paragraph afterwards: 

 

"This Council supports the Justin Edinburgh 3 Foundation with its campaign for legislative change on the installation of Automated External Defibrillators within health and sports facilities, whilst raising awareness of cardiac arrest and delivering CPR training."

 

Following debate, the proposer of the original motion, Councillor Kimberly Barrett, agreed to subsume the amendment put by Councillor Simon Bosher into the motion.

 

Following a vote, the substantive motion incorporating the amendment in the name of Councillor Simon Bosher was declared CARRIED.

 

It was therefore RESOLVED that:

 

Ever since the harrowing scenes of Danish footballer Christian Eriksen receiving cardiac treatment were broadcast onto the screens of millions of people during a game at Euro 2020, the recognition of the need of public defibrillators has become more apparent.

 

On average, 30,000 people each year suffer a sudden cardiac arrest outside of hospital, and 20% of these incidents occur in public spaces. Only 10% of victims of cardiac arrests survive when the incident occurs outside hospital.

 

Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) can play a significant role in saving the lives of people who suffer heart attacks in public. It is estimated that a shock from an AED, alongside CPR treatment, increases survival rates to 75-80%.

 

This Council commends the many organisations, schools and communities who have already installed community defibrillators that are accessible not just to the organisations themselves, but, that are also accessible to members of the public. It acknowledges that places like Fratton Community Centre are raising funds to make sure that the centre will have access to this life saving equipment.

 

This Council congratulates the work of all those schools and community groups who have raised money to buy and install defibrillators and acknowledges the support of Ward Councillors from all political parties who have supported the fund raising efforts with CIL contributions.

 

This Council supports the Justin Edinburgh 3 Foundation with its campaign for legislative change on the installation of Automated External Defibrillators within health and sports facilities, whilst raising awareness of cardiac arrest and delivering CPR training.

 

This Council also commends the outstanding work and care that the South Central Ambulance Service, Queen Alexandra Hospital and staff across all areas of the NHS provide Portsmouth residents 24/7, 365 days a year. The Council would also like to thank the work that the British Heart Foundation are doing to continue to research into cardiac arrests but also, the campaigning that they have done alongside other organisations to get CPR onto the curriculum at English secondary schools by the end of this school year. This is alongside the work that they are doing regarding 'The Circuit' to create a national network of defibrillators which will link to every ambulance service in the country and in the public domain to help save more lives from 'Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrests' (OHCA).

 

Although there are a number of public defibrillators on council premises and assets and further more on non-council owned land and buildings, there may be gaps in the provision of publicly accessible AEDs across the city.

 

Council resolves to ask Cabinet:

 

•    To add as many existing defibrillator locations to the list hosted on the council's website, and to also add those not already on the South Central Ambulance Service's 'Save a life' App, to make sure that there is a log of as many locations as possible of public defibrillators in Portsmouth including those in non-council premises.

 

•    Review and, where appropriate, seek to increase the provision of defibrillators across council-owned spaces including public parks, community centres, leisure facilities, and areas of high public footfall and to continue to support businesses, community associations and schools who may wish to install their own and bring an update report to Cabinet to demonstrate progress.

33.

Elections Bill pdf icon PDF 322 KB

Proposed by Councillor Gerald Vernon-Jackson

Seconded by Councillor Hugh Mason

 

Portsmouth City Council recognises the importance of ensuring that elections are fair and accessible for all voters.

 

The City Council notes that the Elections Bill is set to bring in major changes to national elections, including the introduction of compulsory photographic ID to vote.

 

The City Council believes that this change will act as a barrier to people voting and increase inequality in the electoral process.

 

The City Council notes with concern that currently 3.5 million people in the UK do not have any form of expensive photographic ID.

 

The City Council notes that these changes are estimated to cost the taxpayer £180 million and will create unnecessary bureaucracy to Councils.

 

The City Council believes that at a time when voter turnout is declining, we should be doing all we can to make it easier, not harder for people to vote.

 

Portsmouth City Council doesn’t want to see people being turned away at the ballot box because of these changes and resolves to support the #HandsOffOurVote campaign by:

 

1.         Writing to Rt Hon Michael Gove MP, Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities

2.         Writing to Portsmouth's local MPs asking them to raise these concerns in Parliament.

Minutes:

It was

 

Proposed by Councillor Gerald Vernon-Jackson

Seconded by Councillor Hugh Mason

 

That notice of motion (b) as set out on the agenda be adopted.

 

As an amendment it was

 

Proposed by Councillor Graham Heaney

Seconded by Councillor George Fielding

 

After campaign in the seventh paragraph insert a full stop then add

 

'The City Council also urges the government to reconsider those measures which seek to change the oversight arrangements of the Electoral Commission and to maintain the Commission's current independence and its accountability to all parties elected to the parliaments of the United Kingdom. We resolve to do this by:'

 

Following debate, the proposer of the original motion, Councillor Gerald Vernon-Jackson agreed to subsume the amendment put by Councillor Graham Heaney into the motion.

 

Upon being put to a vote the substantive notice of motion incorporating the amendment in the name of Councillor Graham Heaney was declared CARRIED.

 

It was therefore RESOLVED that Portsmouth City Council recognises the importance of ensuring that elections are fair and accessible for all voters.

 

The City Council notes that the Elections Bill is set to bring in major changes to national elections, including the introduction of compulsory photographic ID to vote.

 

The City Council believes that this change will act as a barrier to people voting and increase inequality in the electoral process.

 

The City Council notes with concern that currently 3.5 million people in the UK do not have any form of expensive photographic ID.

 

The City Council notes that these changes are estimated to cost the taxpayer £180 million and will create unnecessary bureaucracy to Councils.

 

The City Council believes that at a time when voter turnout is declining, we should be doing all we can to make it easier, not harder for people to vote.

 

Portsmouth City Council doesn’t want to see people being turned away at the ballot box because of these changes and resolves to support the #HandsOffOurVote campaign. The City Council also urges the government to reconsider those measures which seek to change the oversight arrangements of the Electoral Commission and to maintain the Commission's current independence and its accountability to all parties elected to the parliaments of the United Kingdom. We resolve to do this by:

 

1.      Writing to Rt Hon Michael Gove MP, Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities

2.      Writing to Portsmouth's local MPs asking them to raise these concerns in Parliament.

34.

Support for Adults with ADHD

Proposed by Councillor Tom Coles

Seconded by Councillor Kirsty Mellor

 

Around 5% of adults are diagnosed with ADHD, many other adults suffer with the condition but lack an official diagnosis.

 

Those with ADHD may struggle with inattentiveness, hyperfocus, hyperactivity, emotional dysregulation and excessive mind wandering.

 

Adults with ADHD present with persistent difficulties in following directions, remembering information, concentrating, organizing tasks, completing work within specified time frames and appearing timely in appointments. These difficulties affect several different areas of an ADHD adult's life, causing emotional, social, vocational, marital, legal, financial and/or academic problems.

 

Studies on adults with ADHD have shown that, more often than not, they experience self-stigma and depression in childhood, commonly resulting from feeling neglected and different from their peers.

 

These problems may play a role in the high levels of depression, substance abuse, and relationship problems that affect adults with ADHD later in life.

 

This Council notes that adults in the UK can face waiting lists of over three years before receiving a diagnosis, even those diagnosed in childhood can expect a lengthy wait if seeking support later in life.

 

This Council notes that, for those in Portsmouth, the nearest NHS-run Adult ADHD and Autism unit is more than thirty miles away in Basingstoke and covers much of Hampshire and Surrey, stretching the service.

 

This Council recognises services for Adults with ADHD are underfunded and overstretched.

 

This Council calls upon the Cabinet Member for Health, Wellbeing and Social Care and the Leader of the Council to write to the Secretary for Health and Social Care urging a full review of Adult ADHD services and implementation of improvements in accessibility to treatment and support.

 

Furthermore, the Council calls upon the Cabinet Member for Health, Wellbeing and Social Care to review with the CCG any improvements in accessibility to treatment and support that could be implemented locally.

 

[1]Kooij JJ, Bijlenga D, Salerno L, Jaeschke R, Bitter I, Balázs J, et al. (February 2019). "Updated European Consensus Statement on diagnosis and treatment of adult ADHD". European Psychiatry. 56: 14–34.

[1]Gentile JP, Atiq R, Gillig PM (August 2006). "Adult ADHD: Diagnosis, Differential Diagnosis, and Medication Management". Psychiatry. 3 (8): 25–30.

[1]McKeague L, Hennessy E, O'Driscoll C, Heary C (June 2015). "Retrospective accounts of self-stigma experienced by young people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or depression". Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal. 38 (2): 158–163.

Minutes:

It was

 

Proposed by Councillor Tom Coles

Seconded by Councillor Kirsty Mellor

 

That notice of motion (c) as set out on the agenda be adopted.

 

Council debated the motion.

 

Upon being put to a vote the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

It was therefore RESOLVED that

 

Around 5% of adults are diagnosed with ADHD, many other adults suffer with the condition but lack an official diagnosis.

 

Those with ADHD may struggle with inattentiveness, hyperfocus, hyperactivity, emotional dysregulation and excessive mind wandering.

 

Adults with ADHD present with persistent difficulties in following directions, remembering information, concentrating, organizing tasks, completing work within specified time frames and appearing timely in appointments. These difficulties affect several different areas of an ADHD adult's life, causing emotional, social, vocational, marital, legal, financial and/or academic problems.

 

Studies on adults with ADHD have shown that, more often than not, they experience self-stigma and depression in childhood, commonly resulting from feeling neglected and different from their peers.

 

These problems may play a role in the high levels of depression, substance abuse, and relationship problems that affect adults with ADHD later in life.

 

This Council notes that adults in the UK can face waiting lists of over three years before receiving a diagnosis, even those diagnosed in childhood can expect a lengthy wait if seeking support later in life.

 

This Council notes that, for those in Portsmouth, the nearest NHS-run Adult ADHD and Autism unit is more than thirty miles away in Basingstoke and covers much of Hampshire and Surrey, stretching the service.

 

This Council recognises services for Adults with ADHD are underfunded and overstretched.

 

This Council calls upon the Cabinet Member for Health, Wellbeing and Social Care and the Leader of the Council to write to the Secretary for Health and Social Care urging a full review of Adult ADHD services and implementation of improvements in accessibility to treatment and support.

 

Furthermore, the Council calls upon the Cabinet Member for Health, Wellbeing and Social Care to review with the CCG any improvements in accessibility to treatment and support that could be implemented locally.

35.

In-sourcing first: reversing the privatisation of council services pdf icon PDF 177 KB

Proposed by Councillor George Fielding

Seconded by Councillor Judith Smyth

 

Full Council notes:

 

1.            During the 2021 local election campaign, Portsmouth Labour made a key manifesto pledge to bring back in-house contracts totalling over £30m a year, including housing repairs and maintenance as well as refuse collection.

 

2.            Councils across the country spend hundreds of millions of pounds buying in essential goods, services and expertise from the private sector each year.

 

3.            The Public Services (Social Value) Act was introduced in 2012. It provides a legal basis for public authorities to look for wider social, economic and environmental benefits when undertaking procurement exercises.

 

4.         Evidence shows that insourcing public services can deliver lower costs, more efficiency, a public sector ethos, economies of scale and an enhanced level of democratic accountability to local residents.

 

Full Council believes:

 

1.            Residents are more likely to trust local councillors to take decisions on their behalf over and above private companies.

 

2.            While residents support their local councils to run services and redistribute wealth, Local Government still requires the financial resources to catalyse new social contracts and make public services local.

 

3.            Public service workers and their trade unions support the insourcing of public services.

 

4.            Investing in strengthening the council’s capacity, skills and ability to deliver services in-house will make the council more sustainable, innovative and effective for the long term.

 

5.            In-sourcing gives the council greater control over how public money is spent, creating more possibilities for supporting small, local businesses in addition to ensuring environmental and social value is recognised.

 

6.         The council must always strive to achieve value for money but this does not just mean choosing the cheapest option. It also means if it is more expensive to insource there may be other benefits to the council and residents such as environmental responsibility, better pay and conditions for staff, supporting local businesses etc.

 

Full Council resolves to call on Cabinet:

 

1.            To develop and introduce an ‘Insourcing First’ policy that makes an assumption that all local authority services should be delivered in-house by the council and that all expiring contracts should be considered for insourcing, unless there are strong countervailing reasons not to (e.g. the need for independence to prevent a conflict of interest).

 

2.            To develop and introduce a rolling calendar review programme for all contracts and purchasing decisions carried out by the council. This should include key dates, contract values, provider names and services covered.

 

3.         To commit to seriously considering the viability of insourcing the housing repairs and maintenance, refuse collection, port security and domiciliary care contracts with associated public reports brought to either Full Council or the relevant portfolio meeting by the fourth quarter of 2022.

Minutes:

It was

 

Proposed by Councillor George Fielding

Seconded by Councillor Judith Smyth

 

That notice of motion (d) as set out on the agenda be adopted.

 

As an amendment it was

 

Proposed by Councillor Gerald Vernon-Jackson

Seconded by Councillor Suzy Horton

 

In 'Full Council resolves to call on Cabinet'paragraph 1 line 3 after the word council add 'or by either voluntary of community sector'

 

In 'Full Council resolves to call on Cabinet' paragraph 1 line 3 after the word council add 'or by voluntary andcommunity sector'

 

Councillor George Fielding did not agree to subsume the amendment put by Councillor Gerald Vernon-Jackson into the motion.

 

Following a vote, the amendment proposed by Councillor Gerald Vernon-Jackson was declared LOST.

 

Council voted on the motion as proposed by Councillor George Fielding.

 

Following a vote, the motion standing in the name of Councillor George Fielding was declared LOST.

36.

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II - Platinum Jubilee

Proposed by Councillor Benedict Swann

Seconded by Councillor Simon Bosher

 

This council offers its congratulations to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on her Platinum Jubilee .  This council requests that an Official Letter is sent to Her Majesty in the name of the people of Portsmouth, in advance of the occasion of the seventieth anniversary of her coronation, wishing Her Majesty the City's  heartiest best wishes and congratulations on a long and glorious reign.

Minutes:

It was

 

Proposed by Councillor Benedict Swann

Seconded by Councillor Simon Bosher

 

That notice of motion (e) as set out on the agenda be adopted.

 

Upon being put to a vote the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

It was therefore RESOLVED that

 

This council offers its congratulations to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on her Platinum Jubilee . This council requests that an Official Letter is sent to Her Majesty in the name of the people of Portsmouth, in advance of the occasion of the seventieth anniversary of her coronation, wishing Her Majesty the City's heartiest best wishes and congratulations on a long and glorious reign.

37.

Constitutional Review

Proposed by Councillor Scott Payter-Harris

Seconded by Councillor Matthew Atkins

 

Portsmouth City Council's constitution sets out how we operate, how decisions are made and the procedures which are followed to ensure that these are efficient, transparent and answerable to local people. Some of these processes are required by the law, while others are a matter for us to choose.

 

However, it is noted that the council has significantly changed in recent years with regards to how it functions, which means the Constitution is somewhat inflexible. This council now believes it is time for the Constitution to be reviewed along with the Council's standing orders and officer member protocol.

 

Therefore the Council requests that a Constitution Working Review group is set up and reports into Governance, Audit and Standards Committee while also reporting back into this Full Council by May 2023.

Minutes:

It was

 

Proposed by Councillor Scott Payter-Harris

Seconded by Councillor Matthew Atkins

 

That notice of motion (f) as set out on the agenda be adopted.

 

Upon being put to a vote the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

It was therefore RESOLVED that

 

Portsmouth City Council's constitution sets out how we operate, how decisions are made and the procedures which are followed to ensure that these are efficient, transparent and answerable to local people. Some of these processes are required by the law, while others are a matter for us to choose.

 

However, it is noted that the council has significantly changed in recent years with regards to how it functions, which means the Constitution is somewhat inflexible. This council now believes it is time for the Constitution to be reviewed along with the Council's standing orders and officer member protocol.

 

Therefore the Council requests that a Constitution Working Review group is set up and reports into Governance, Audit and Standards Committee while also reporting back into this Full Council by May 2023.

38.

Local Plan

Proposed by Councillor Ryan Brent

Seconded by Cllr Scott Payter-Harris

 

The council condemns the Liberal Democrat Administration's mismanagement of the Local Plan and notes that the effect of such sustained mismanagement in a financial and strategic sense in pushing back the Local Plan Timetable has clear ramifications in terms of reputation and service delivery,  and further that upon any objective basis such behaviour and omission  on the part of the Administration is reprehensible.

Minutes:

It was

 

Proposed by Councillor Ryan Brent

Seconded by Councillor Scott Payter-Harris

 

That notice of motion (g) as set out on the agenda be adopted.

 

Council debated the matter.

 

At the conclusion of the debate, eight members of the council requested that a recorded vote be taken on this item under Standing Order No.48b.

 

 

The following members voted in favour

 

Councillor Matthew Atkins

Councillor Simon Bosher

Councillor Hannah Brent

Councillor Ryan Brent

Councillor Lewis Gosling

Councillor Gemma New

Councillor Terry Norton

Councillor Lee Mason

Councillor Robert New

Councillor Scott Payter-Harris

 

Councillor John Smith

Councillor Luke Stubbs

Councillor Benedict Swann

Councillor Linda Symes

 

 

The following members voted against

 

Councillor Dave Ashmore

Councillor Kimberly Barrett

Councillor Tom Coles

Councillor Cal Corkery

Councillor Ben Dowling

Councillor Jason Fazackarley

Councillor George Fielding

Councillor Charlotte Gerada

Councillor Graham Heaney

Councillor Ian Holder

Councillor Suzy Horton

Councillor Lee Hunt

Councillor George Madgwick

Councillor Kirsty Mellor

Councillor Hugh Mason

Councillor Jeanette Smith

Councillor Judith Smyth

Councillor Lynne Stagg

Councillor Claire Udy

Councillor Gerald Vernon-Jackson

Councillor Rob Wood  

 

The following member abstained from voting

 

Councillor Frank Jonas

 

The motion was declared LOST.

39.

Questions from Members under Standing Order No 17 pdf icon PDF 119 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Eleven questions and one urgent question from members had been received under Standing Order No 17.

 

The urgent question was from Councillor Simon Bosher.

 

"Portsmouth City Council has a 3 year contract with Gazprom to supply 100% of our natural gas to council-operated buildings including communal heating in our social housing properties, schools and tenanted buildings. In light of the invasion of Ukraine by the Russian Federation, what steps are being taken to cancel this contract?"

 

This and supplementary questions were answered by the Leader, Councillor Gerald Vernon-Jackson.  The Leader advised that the Council had a break clause for the contract in September 2022, which would be actioned unless prior to this date the Government took action to remove Gazprom's ability to supply to the British market.  As part of this process the Leader was requested to write to the energy broker to ask that they waive their fees associated with this contract termination, or that they consider donating the fee to an appropriate charity supporting the crisis in the Ukraine.

 

Council noted that a briefing for all Members on this matter was scheduled to be held on Friday 18 March 2022.

 

 

The first question was from Councillor Cal Corkery.

 

"Is the Cabinet Member for Community Safety aware of the apparent degradation in safe working practices with regards to breathing apparatus and high rise firefighting within Hampshire and Isle of Wight Fire and Rescue Service?"

 

Councillor Dave Ashmore deferred to Councillor Jason Fazackarley as the Council's representative on the Hampshire Fire & Rescue Authority. This question was answered by Councillor Jason Fazackarley who advised that he would take up the issue with both the Fire and Rescue Authority and its Members.

 

 

The second question was from Councillor Charlotte Gerada.

 

"Can the Cabinet Member for Traffic and Transportation explain why no bike hangars will be rolled out in any wards in the north of the city, despite there being a number of requests from Nelson, Cosham, Hilsea and Copnor residents?"

 

This and supplementary questions were answered by the Cabinet Member for Traffic & Transportation, Cllr Lynne Stagg.

 

 

The third question was from Councillor Judith Smyth.

 

"I understand that there is a new approach to removing graffiti and tagging from Portsmouth streets.  Please explain what you are doing to monitor whether this is working?"

 

This and supplementary questions were answered by the Cabinet Member for Community Safety & Environment, Cllr Dave Ashmore.

 

 

The fourth question was from Councillor Hannah Brent.

 

"Can you confirm what consultation was undertaken with residents in Cliffdale Gardens/Henderson Road with regard to the charging of commission on sales of mobile homes."

 

In the absence of the Cabinet Member for Housing & Preventing Homelessness the Leader advised that a written response would be forwarded.

 

 

The fifth question was from Councillor Ryan Brent.

 

"Can the Cabinet Member provide an update on the progress of the development at Tipner West?"

 

This and supplementary questions were answered by the Cabinet Member for Planning Policy & City Development, Cllr Hugh Mason.

 

The Lord Mayor advised that the 45 minutes allowed for this item under Standing Order No.17h had passed and that the answers to the remaining questions would be circulated to all members in writing.

 

At the conclusion of the meeting the Lord Mayor thanked those Councillors who were standing down at the May 2022 elections for their excellent service to the Council.

 

The Leader of the Council thanked the Lord Mayor for his work during his term of office.